Greetings from Norway

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Smitten
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Greetings from Norway

Post by Smitten » Tue Jun 04, 2019 4:20 pm

Lots of EVs and seen a few Jags already, one of each SUV type so far but the view from the car park at the local Spar Supermarket is the most telling of the difference between here and the UK...

20190604_171615.jpg

3.0d S, Santorini black, black pack, 22" black rims, LEDs, Priv, 350W, ICTP, Ebony interior, AdSR, space saver, config ambient, remote release, lumbar, winter pack, rear recline. Build date Friday 13/4/18 :D


corriescar66
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Re: Greetings from Norway

Post by corriescar66 » Tue Jun 04, 2019 4:26 pm

Smitten wrote:
Tue Jun 04, 2019 4:20 pm
Lots of EVs and seen a few Jags already, one of each SUV type so far but the view from the car park at the local Spar Supermarket is the most telling of the difference between here and the UK...
Wot, no Fjord Cortinas?? :lol: Boom, boom....


Smitten
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Re: Greetings from Norway

Post by Smitten » Tue Jun 04, 2019 5:18 pm

:lol:
3.0d S, Santorini black, black pack, 22" black rims, LEDs, Priv, 350W, ICTP, Ebony interior, AdSR, space saver, config ambient, remote release, lumbar, winter pack, rear recline. Build date Friday 13/4/18 :D


Deltasierra
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Re: Greetings from Norway

Post by Deltasierra » Wed Jun 05, 2019 9:20 am

All those charging points and only one car using them, Mr Tesla must be disappointed.
Seriously, the cost of living, lifestyle and government incentives are much different in Norway, not to mention population. Here the government has reduced incentives and at present the cost benefit calculation does not favor electric, so for those with EVs or hybrids its an ethical or lifestyle choice not economic. Plus Norway’s electricity is predominantly hydro so there is no extra pollution from power stations charging EVs, so every reason to change quickly
I’m sure that we will change gradually and in 10 yrs EVs will dominate the market but unless there is a big change in technology or incentive my next car will not be an EV.
FPace 3.0D Portfolio Loire Blue, light interior, tow bar. No issues a very good car
Gone F Pace Prestige 2 liter Auto, tow bar, reversing camera, 14 way seats, 18 inch all season tyres
XKR Convertible


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catwoman
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Re: Greetings from Norway

Post by catwoman » Wed Jun 05, 2019 11:15 am

Nothing to do with Norway, so apologies in advance to Smitten's post above - looks great by the way!

Absolutely anyone who can afford to own and run an F-Pace in Britain can definitely afford to own an EV today. Regardless of whether you believe changing to electric will impact any future outcome of climate breakdown, the everyday air quality in our towns and cities is already awful, just take a breath and see for yourself, so the sooner mass adoption of electric transport comes the better for all of us. Consideration for your own grandchildren's and others' health should really be enough to sway your conscience over your next car purchase.

It is wrong to say it is simply an ethical or lifestyle choice, there is definitely an economic benefit to be had as well. I know this for a fact because we already have an EV in our household and it has saved us an astonishing amount of money on daily travelling costs. Incentives are being reduced because costs have reduced and you shouldn't need to be 'bribed' to make the choice anyway, because even without any government incentive, pounds per mile, electric charging already works out at a fraction of the cost of filling up with diesel or petrol and the electricity is available from entirely renewably sourced generation right now. Companies like Octopus Energy guarantee to supply you with 100% renewable electricity. We switched to one of their tariffs and we are actually saving money on our kWh unit rate over what we were paying previously.

It is understandable that people are resistant to change, but don't try to convince yourself using lame excuses, nor let yourself be misled by fossil industry propaganda, to put off doing what is, inevitably, the right thing.
8-) . . been enjoying since July '16, 2.0d R-Sport, Ammonite + Black Pack, Jet/Red interior and a few useful options


corriescar66
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Re: Greetings from Norway

Post by corriescar66 » Wed Jun 05, 2019 12:04 pm

The 'electric vehicle boom could leave 11m tonnes of spent lithium-ion batteries in need of recycling between now and 2030, according to Ajay Kochhar, CEO of Canadian battery recycling startup Li-Cycle. However, in the EU as few as 5% (pdf) of lithium-ion batteries are recycled. This has an environmental cost. Not only do the batteries carry a risk of giving off toxic gases if damaged, but core ingredients such as lithium and cobalt are finite and extraction can lead to water pollution and depletion among other environmental consequences. '

If you think the true environmental cost per mile is measured via a meter on your 13 amp plug then you need think a bit harder...

Battery powered cars are not the answer, but at best stop gap for the conscience of the middle class - maybe. They certainly would move the air quality problems in part from urban centres to concentrating it round the power stations, but there is also the plastics needed to consider.

And what about consumerism in general? I'm not an anti-capitalist, but the waste of resources, including power, to feed a frenzy of 'keeping up with the Jones'. I'm environmentally friendly. I own the same car I had when I was 19. Ok, it's rusty and currently only capable of having 3 wheels, but what's wrong with make do and mend?

As for getting your electricity from 100% renewable source........more suppliers now claim to offer ‘100% renewable’ tariffs, despite holding little or no contracts with renewable generators....... for example, read this regarding Shell.. https://www.goodenergy.co.uk/blog/2019/ ... ith-regos/

There is one grid. All producers feed into that grid, be it gas, coal, nuclear etc then consumers take from the mix. Feel free to stand by your meter box with a cricket bat and knock for six any electron you feel may have come from nasty fossil fuels..........

A breakdown of where the UK’s electricity came from in 2018:

40.7%: Gas-fired power stations
28.1%: Renewables
22.5%: Nuclear plants
1.3%: Coal-fired power stations
7.4%: Electricity imports

I'm on a 100% green tariff, but this is for price, not because I believe for a moment I'm hugging the planet each time I boil a kettle... although every fourth one I run out to sniff the air and see if I've made a difference...


Felixstowe
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Re: Greetings from Norway

Post by Felixstowe » Wed Jun 05, 2019 6:06 pm

I have considered swapping my Fpace for an electric car but to be honest range is the problem for me. The average appears to be around the 200mile range and I drive a lot of long journeys as such I need around 100 miles more.

Why has electricity taken the pole position ? I’ve been taking a lot of interest in hydrogen as an alternative, zero emissions ( apart from water). A quoted 5 minute recharge giving an average of 300 miles ( now that floats my boat) the only problem seems to be that not that many manufacturers have jumped on the hydrogen bandwagon and there are not many places to re-fill in the uk. Perhaps that might change if sales increase, but they won’t unless the infer structure is there. 😱
F Pace R-Sport 2.0D AWD, M/Y 18, Black pack, memory seats, Glass roof, ITCP, 22” wheels. plus a few other bits!
Previously:
XF, XE, XJ, S Type and the first car X Type.


Deltasierra
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Re: Greetings from Norway

Post by Deltasierra » Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:07 pm

I have a niece that has a Renault Zoe EV as a runabout, she wants to save the planet and hubby wants to save cash, fair enough, sounds like a marriage made in heaven , so let’s see what Renault claim in economy.

Range 150 miles or so on one charge costing £6.15 @ 15p/kw
Battery rental is £59 / month guaranteed for 10 yrs
Mileage is 10k /yr

Electricity £49 + £708 battery rent - £757 - 7.5p per mile
10k miles at 50 mpg -200l at £1.30 liter - £260 - 2.6p per mile

So that is Renault’s offering, you can argue that it is a poor choice but which ever way you look at it if battery depreciation is included the economics of EVs is highly questionable and you are very unlikely to save money.
The Jaguar IPace is a similar size to the EPace but costs around £25k more, the battery is guaranteed for 8 yrs and is double the Renault’s capacity, in a heavier car it is going to be way off the economy of an EPace at 40mpg plus

Most car buyers have worked that out and don’t buy EVs
FPace 3.0D Portfolio Loire Blue, light interior, tow bar. No issues a very good car
Gone F Pace Prestige 2 liter Auto, tow bar, reversing camera, 14 way seats, 18 inch all season tyres
XKR Convertible


KHatman
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Re: Greetings from Norway

Post by KHatman » Thu Jun 06, 2019 6:27 am

I think your maths is "slightly" wrong. You'd need 200 gallons to do 10,000 miles @ 50 mpg surely? So think you need to then times by something like 4.66 giving a total fuel cost of in the region of £1200 or 12p a mile. I still think though the increased purchase cost of the vehicle needs consideration as well.
2019 F Pace 2.0D R Sport, Manual, Corris grey and very little else


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catwoman
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Re: Greetings from Norway

Post by catwoman » Thu Jun 06, 2019 8:12 am

KHatman wrote:
Thu Jun 06, 2019 6:27 am
I think your maths is "slightly" wrong. You'd need 200 gallons to do 10,000 miles @ 50 mpg surely?
I agree, but I'm afraid if Deltasierra thinks "Most car buyers have worked that out and don’t buy EVs", then they need to stop kidding themselves using laughable back-of-fag-packet maths like the example given in his post above, which manages to confuse imperial and metric measures and include capital costs of vehicle ownership as running costs :roll:

Here's what I know: in our case we have a 50 miles per day commute (so that's 250 miles per working week) and it was costing £40 to fill the car with diesel each week. Since changing over to an EV and doing exactly the same commute it now costs only £7.50 in electricity per week. That's a saving of £32.50 per week, or to put it another way, £130 per month. Whichever way you look at that, it's a massive saving on pounds per mile and a fantastic economic benefit in running costs, which was the point I was making.

Perhaps I should amend the statement I made about lame excuses and fossil propaganda to include lousy maths too! :lol:
8-) . . been enjoying since July '16, 2.0d R-Sport, Ammonite + Black Pack, Jet/Red interior and a few useful options


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