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So I was wondering... what are peoples thoughts about running in a modern-day engine?

Years ago, a new engine would need an oil change after the first few hundred or a thousand miles or so to remove fine metal shavings from the oil that might occur as the engine beds in - in this situation, 'running in' makes sense... let the moving parts get to know each other gently to prolong their lifespan.

Nowadays, you don't need to service a new car until 21,000 miles (2.0d) or 16,000 miles (3.0d & SC) because the engineering is so much more advanced and the engine and moving parts, I assume, run smoothly from day 1. So do modern-day engines really need a run-in period?

Views seem to be mixed and I've even heard people say that stretching a diesel engine from day 1 opens it up nicely for a more sprightly performance in the longer run.

Personally, I go by the rule of not going over 2/3rds engine speed for the first few hundred miles (I might push this a handful of times! :lol:) which means around 3-3,500rpm for a diesel engine and still allows for an easy drive as the torque is much lower down.
 

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I think the advances are in the oils used inside the engine plays as much a part in the length of period between services as the mechanicals themselves.
 

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Well i have chatted to a few mechanics on this subject and again differing views, but the consensus of opinion was that it can do no harm giving the engine a gentle build up to normal operation as any athlete would, your average runner doesn't go trying to carry out a marathon in the first week of training he builds up. Yes i know its a car and a mixture of metals plastics and oils. But i feel theres no harm in running in.

Im doing pretty much the same as ******Matt is suggesting..... I have done approx 480 miles now mainly motorway and been up in to the 90s mph but 90 is only about 2500 revs and mainly in eco mode so it doesnt rev to high between gear changes and the odd burst away from the lights in dynamic when the engine is warm. So for the engine is doing great returning an average of 38-39mpg overall (2.0d ingenium) im very pleased with the engine its quiet refined and does have a throaty snarl when a little stretched.

So in summary id say run in, cant do any harm whereas razzing the nuts of from day one, and if there is any damage its done.
 

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There is a link in this forum to the online F Pace vehicle manual. It has a section on maintenance with a subsection headed 'running in'. My guess is that this will also be in the manual delivered with the car.
The instruction is that the F Pace should be run in. I have always followed very similar instructions with previous Jags and Land Rovers and it has always paid dividends ( just sold my Disco 4 which was under 3 years old and had 56k on the clock. It was run in and never missed a beat)
 

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Hi guys/gals... what's the best way to run in a vehicle and more so the FE.. I'm sure there's many variations out there but I've never looked at the manual for such, I guess I should, I'm definitely going to try but for sure it's hard when you're on a straight and to ease off the peddle ))) well... it would be, but I'll have to wait till mine gets fixed/sorted.
 

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Here you go:

The vehicle is built using high-precision manufacturing methods, but the moving parts of the engine must still bed-in, relative to each other. The process occurs mainly in the first 3 000 km of operation.

During this running-in period of 3 000 km, observe and follow the instructions below:

Do not use a fully depressed accelerator pedal during starts and normal driving.

Avoid high engine speeds (rpm) until the engine has reached its full operating temperature.

Avoid labouring the engine by operating the engine in too high a gear at low speeds.

Gradually increase engine and road speeds.

Avoid continuous operation at high engine speed and abrupt stops.

Avoid frequent cold starts followed by short-distance driving.

Preferably take longer journeys.

Do not participate in track days, sports driving schools, or any similar events.
 
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