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The Highway Code is clear on the subject, rule 123. Not to mention the emission and noise pollution caused. The fines seem to be about £30, so not much of a deterrent.
Unless Jaguar CS have any comment.
 

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Ive been out of the UK for nine years and returning next year and looks like I need a major update on the highway code. Let me get this right, is it against the law to start up a car on public road to warm it be it remotely or not?
 

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If you are in the car warming it up, defrosting Windows etc, then there's no problem. The law comes into force where a running vehicle is left unattended. But it's a low risk of being caught so I wouldn't worry too much.
The only thing that would concern me is having a cold engine running at tick over speed, all that wear and tear, although with modern synthetic lubricants that may not be the problem it was.
 

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The ONLY mention that I could find in the highway code book is Rule 239.

Which states :-

If you have to stop on the roadside: you MUST switch off the engine, headlights and fog lights

There is nothing about on a Driveway or private road, and even the above only seems to apply to public roads. So even a car park (which are normally owned by a company) is dubious.

Look for yourself, don't rely on people on a forum telling you anything (even me)

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/the-highway-code

"I read on a facebook that I can drive over roundabouts between 00:00 and 00:59 hours" .... won't go down well in court :mrgreen:
 

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AlSnr said:
The only thing that would concern me is having a cold engine running at tick over speed, all that wear and tear, although with modern synthetic lubricants that may not be the problem it was.
My thinking was the opposite. I thought it would be good to tick over and gently get warm as opposed to getting straight in and tearing off up the road on a freezing cold morning. Does anyone out there know about such things? I'd like to know.
 

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catalyst said:
AlSnr said:
The only thing that would concern me is having a cold engine running at tick over speed, all that wear and tear, although with modern synthetic lubricants that may not be the problem it was.
My thinking was the opposite. I thought it would be good to tick over and gently get warm as opposed to getting straight in and tearing off up the road on a freezing cold morning. Does anyone out there know about such things? I'd like to know.
It always used to be said that you shouldn't let a car tick over when it was cold .. better to drive gently to get the oil moving. Pretty sure all of that stuff is ignored these days with modern engines. Even so I ran mine in.
 

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JLRnumber5 said:
catalyst said:
AlSnr said:
The only thing that would concern me is having a cold engine running at tick over speed, all that wear and tear, although with modern synthetic lubricants that may not be the problem it was.
My thinking was the opposite. I thought it would be good to tick over and gently get warm as opposed to getting straight in and tearing off up the road on a freezing cold morning. Does anyone out there know about such things? I'd like to know.
It always used to be said that you shouldn't let a car tick over when it was cold .. better to drive gently to get the oil moving. Pretty sure all of that stuff is ignored these days with modern engines. Even so I ran mine in.
Well I'm an engineer, albeit a chemical engineer. I work as a research process engineer in the food industry.

My understanding would be hammering an engine straight after start-up would do damage, conversely if it's cold there may be more viscous oil which is harder to push/pump around the system so might require more power. Main thing to note in my view is a cold engine will be smaller, when it warms up, thermal expansion will apply, which may increase gap sizes within the engine i.e. increase the built in tolerances (even slightly) which might mean less rubbing and hence wear on the engine components. However when the engine is firing it is effectively creating explosions within the chamber, which will warm it up pretty quick, but might take time to warm other parts of the system.

When we start up equipment, we start on low RPM first always and then gradually increase. For pumps I'd guess it depends on the pressure head you need to push, you might need more power to get it moving and then can calm once it's going.

I do believe the running in came primarily from older style engines where you needed to mix in oil to lubricate the engine and actually wear down the engine carefully and gradually to get it to where it should be, machining in those days was not as accurate or clean. I certainly remember running in a 2 stroke engine on a bike I had when I was 16.

Please note I've not answered the question, as I do not have a definitive answer, but have just given thoughts and reasoning :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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Old oils were thick and horrible... and got even worse over time, hence the view of not letting cars tick over cold, and get them running at operational temp asap.

New synthetic oils are a totally different story. Even synth oil a day away from a service and complete change would be fine ticking over cold, and would keep your engine lubricated.

Check this out :

Skip to 5:30 for oil comparison. This is at -35deg F (-37deg C)

You can see if running your car cold in an normal oil that's old ... your engine would be just metal on metal. Synthetic Modem Oils are brilliant.
 

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Gdank said:
Old oils were thick and horrible... and got even worse over time, hence the view of not letting cars tick over cold, and get them running at operational temp asap.

New synthetic oils are a totally different story. Even synth oil a day away from a service and complete change would be fine ticking over cold, and would keep your engine lubricated.

Check this out :
Skip to 5:30 for oil comparison. This is at -35deg F (-37deg C)

You can see if running your car cold in an normal oil that's old ... your engine would be just metal on metal. Synthetic Modem Oils are brilliant.
nice explanation in regards to what happens to viscosity as temperature increases, however the videos science is fatally floored for a number of reasons...

Firstly viscosity is actually a measure of flowability or resistance to flow at a specified shear rate ( s^(-1)). but this doens't affect the results only that the terminology used is not 100% correct.
Secondly and here's the really important part, there is no mention of the physical properties of the Oil, whether it is Newtonian or Non-Newtonian (from the graph it is a straight line so I am assuming it is Newtonian), shear thickening or shear-thinning (From the graph it is shear thinning, when temperature is applied it becomes thinner and when higher shear rates are applied it would also thin). the real issue in my mind is Hysteresis, they have only showed what happens when temperature is applied to the oil and not how the same oil would react when the temperature is first applied and then removed (it may have no hysteresis and return to the identical viscosity as originally seen uniformly, or it might return to a thinner viscosity at initial temperature and then after a time period (perhaps short) return to the original viscosity.
 

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JLRnumber5 said:
^ exactly what I was thinking. :D
Haha! I'm a geeky chemical process engineer, I work in research and development for a very large food manufacturer in errmmm...wait for it... Chocolate!

I've done a lot of Rheology for work as it's vitally important for new products and new processing equipment.
 

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Waynem said:
Are they bringing out the F pace Bar :?: :shock:
An electrical fault in every bite :shock: :eek: :lol:
Haha! No I think they're plagued with enough media relations problems at the moment, even if almost all are entirely created by the media by twisting truth and fact to portray the story they want :lol:
 

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Returning to the OP's question for a moment. I have started reading through the online manual because that's the thing I love. Always have.

The following statement appears in the section about remote starting....

Some markets may prohibit the use of remote engine starting. Responsibility remains with the driver to know if this function can legally be used.

As previously stated, here in the U.K. it does appear that a car ticking over without a driver on a purblind road would not be legal. But for those of us with drives or private roads outside our houses we're okay.

Arianne
 

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Arianne said:
Returning to the OP's question for a moment. I have started reading through the online manual because that's the thing I love. Always have.

The following statement appears in the section about remote starting....

Some markets may prohibit the use of remote engine starting. Responsibility remains with the driver to know if this function can legally be used.

As previously stated, here in the U.K. it does appear that a car ticking over without a driver on a purblind road would not be legal. But for those of us with drives or private roads outside our houses we're okay.

Arianne
I park on the street and currently I'm using remote start daily. Brilliant feature. Always start about 5 mins before I leave the house. Arrive to the car toasty warm and all the windows defrosted. Genius. Heated seats on would be great too but alas they aren't available remotely. I'll take the risk of getting a ticket. It will be an interesting conversation!
 
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