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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking forward to delivery of my new F-Pace in about 6 weeks.
I have a question - how long does it take for the engine to "break in" and do I need to do anything differently? I was going to try to keep the revs below 3000 for the first 1000 miles but don't know if I'll be able to resist the temptation...
Any thoughts?
 

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You do not need to break the engine in as this is done in production, the old days this was not done so you had to do it but no need anymore, feel free to rev away.

What you do find is that after a few thousand miles it loosens up a little and feels a lot more free on revving ect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great news - many thanks!
Looking forward to that exhaust note already!!
 

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Jagfpacejk said:
You do not need to break the engine in as this is done in production, the old days this was not done so you had to do it but no need anymore, feel free to rev away.

What you do find is that after a few thousand miles it loosens up a little and feels a lot more free on revving ect.
I'm really interested in this question too as I hear conflicting stories with some saying (even user manuals) to run it in gently but I also hear other stories about not needing to do it these days which I tend to lean towards as surely technology has moved on right? and we're not being asked for an oil change after the first 1,000 miles to remove all the crap that develops from running new metal on metal....

Out of interest, where did you hear about the factory running in the engines to the point where this no run in period required for the new owner?
 

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It's your choice, but the manual clearly states to take it easy to begin with, to vary the revs, but not labour the engine and take it for longer runs rather than lots of short ones, so that it is properly warmed up, basically just to avoid doing anything that stresses the new engine too much until it loosens up. Personally, I can't see what the hardship is in taking it easy for the first few hundred miles or so, just to be on the safe side, there's no point revving the proverbial posterior end off it and then regretting it later!
 

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Not as essential as the old days, but still good practise. I've always worked on the principle, look after the car, and the car will look after you. It's not just the engine to consider, transmission, brakes etc etc.
Only 3 days to go, and I'm an f pace owner, I'll treat it with respect for the first 1000 miles, and be confident it won't go to the dealer till its 2 year service. I have every confidence in my fantastic dealer, who has made the process pleasurable, yet as a sceptical sort of person, I shall check everything on Catwomans list. :shock:
 

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I agree. It shouldn't be as important and you have a full warranty on the car BUT
The manual does say if I'm not mistaken you have to break in for 3000 KM ?

I think once I've got 5 - 6 hundred miles on the clock I'll be stepping it up but I think the key as with any car is make sure the engine is nice and warm first
Maybe keep the revs below 4K but interested to get official quote from the manual again and proper Jag advise.
Is it same for Petrol and Diesel ?

I'll have a manual tomorrow :)
 

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There is another good reason. Ever such a lot of accidents occur when folk get a new car. Apart from the different handling and performance characteristics there is also the fact that there's a whole lot to learn about accessing the functionality of the car.

This stage is known as 'conscious incompetence' and it's the stage of learning before everything becomes second nature and you do stuff without needing to think about it - the brain is a wonderful thing at multi-taking and most stuff occurs without us needing to clog up our mind with endless instructions. In sport it's when you start performing automatically on instinct and that's what makes you great (or just about okay if it's my five aside football skills under consideration).

Driving a little more carefully and not pushing the car to its limits will benefit the driver and not just the car. I will be stepping up from a 2.0 four cylinder SUV and, based upon my test drives, I have a lot to learn. And no I don't want to go on a special driver training course!

I will be taking it easy when ours comes for both car and driver.

Best wishes.

Arianne
 

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MyNameIsMatt said:
Jagfpacejk said:
You do not need to break the engine in as this is done in production, the old days this was not done so you had to do it but no need anymore, feel free to rev away.

What you do find is that after a few thousand miles it loosens up a little and feels a lot more free on revving ect.
I'm really interested in this question too as I hear conflicting stories with some saying (even user manuals) to run it in gently but I also hear other stories about not needing to do it these days which I tend to lean towards as surely technology has moved on right? and we're not being asked for an oil change after the first 1,000 miles to remove all the crap that develops from running new metal on metal....

Out of interest, where did you hear about the factory running in the engines to the point where this no run in period required for the new owner?
Engine break-in

A new engine is broken in by following specific driving guidelines during the first few hours of its use. The focus of breaking in an engine is on the contact between the piston rings of the engine and the cylinder wall. There is no universal preparation or set of instructions for breaking in an engine. Most importantly, experts disagree on whether it is better to start engines on high or low power to break them in. While there are still consequences to an unsuccessful break-in, they are harder to quantify on modern engines than on older models. In general, people no longer break in the engines of their own vehicles after purchasing a car or motorcycle, because the process is done in production. It is still common, even today, to find that an owner's manual recommends gentle use at first (often specified as the first 500 or 1000 kilometers or miles). But it is usually only normal use without excessive demands that is specified, as opposed to light/limited use. For example, the manual will specify that the car be driven normally, but not in excess of the highway speed limit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Some great replies here - I'm really grateful. Thank you!

Sounds like I need to be sensible in coming to terms with the new vehicle especially the 380 horses. My instinct is to go easy for 1000 miles but I will relax in the knowledge that the occasional rev or burst of acceleration won't do any harm.

Thanks all and happy (and safe) driving.
 

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Despite most modern engines being run in on the bench, I was told 300 rpm for first 500 miles & 4500rpm max until 1500 miles

This is what I will stick to.

Most service arrangements now are made for fleet buyers to make them sound cheap to run.

If you will change in 3 yrs then drive how you like - the worst that will happen is slightly poorer mpg & poss higher oil consumption....

Personally Non....
 

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OK, here's the technical bit. My speciality too, as I own one of the largest honing companies in Europe.
The key part of a good engine is the interface between the piston rings and the cylinders, and the critical part of that is the surface finish of the cylinders. The surface finish must be 'plateaued' for it to work correctly. A plateau surface finish is one that has deep valleys (to act as a reservoir for the oil) and flat tops (to act as a bearing surface). Too much plateau and there won't be anywhere for the oil to live; leading to high friction, reduced horsepower and greater wear, whereas if the valleys are too deep then this will lead to excessive oil consumption.
In the good old days the cylinders would be honed without a plateau finish and a running in process would be needed to remove the peaks so as to give you the surface finish you want -and leave loads of tiny metallic particles floating around the engine which is why you needed an oil change after 1000 miles or so.
Now the bores are rough honed to create the valleys and then plateaued using a fine abrasive to remove the peaks, creating the ideal surface finish, and eliminating the need to run in the bores. It is however good practise not to thrash the car from day one as the rest of the mechanical parts do like a few hours running to bed themselves in -use it too hard from the start and you'll run the risk of tearing any metal to metal surfaces that are a bit tight leading to excessive wear.
Hope this helps
 

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That is an awesome reply! Thank you! Fully satisfied my geek fix for the evening :geek: :)
 

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Dec_mcginn said:
Some great replies here - I'm really grateful. Thank you!

Sounds like I need to be sensible in coming to terms with the new vehicle especially the 380 horses. My instinct is to go easy for 1000 miles but I will relax in the knowledge that the occasional rev or burst of acceleration won't do any harm.

Thanks all and happy (and safe) driving.
So in my SC I was sensible for 300 miles, gave it an extra 1500rpm upto 500, then have been been merrily enjoying myself, I wouldn't be too worried about selecting dynamic yes it holds revs longer and perhaps I wouldn't for first 250-300, the one to watch is sport auto gearbox selection and dynamic, self selecting downshifts when backing off into corners and how long it holds the gear before an upshot I would deem a bit to aggressive before some decent runs and at least 500 miles, it turns from a gentlemans express into a hooligan in S and Dynamic, frankly it's a bit too intense at times unless you feeling like a motoring journalist in max attack testing mode :mrgreen: :lol: :D

I am at 1500 miles in my SC, I had an intial leaking diff seal from day one and a defective header tank (both soon fixed) thereafter mechanically it's been an unalloyed treat yes I have occasional ITCP issues which are maddening but infrequent.

Its great fun to drive and the sound is intoxicating, I hope you have some tunnels near you.... The one thing it isn't is discrete if you are having fun :lol: :lol: after a lot of test drives and discounting an RRS and a Macan S it's was the SC or a Golf R and a late 80's 500 SL..... I am very pleased with my decision, but I still think a mechanical V8 SL will be needed before everything goes self drive......an V8's are outlawed by Chairman Corbyn..... Perhaps I will have to buy a Zil at that point.....
 

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chastt said:
OK, here's the technical bit. My speciality too, as I own one of the largest honing companies in Europe.
The key part of a good engine is the interface between the piston rings and the cylinders, and the critical part of that is the surface finish of the cylinders. The surface finish must be 'plateaued' for it to work correctly. A plateau surface finish is one that has deep valleys (to act as a reservoir for the oil) and flat tops (to act as a bearing surface). Too much plateau and there won't be anywhere for the oil to live; leading to high friction, reduced horsepower and greater wear, whereas if the valleys are too deep then this will lead to excessive oil consumption.
In the good old days the cylinders would be honed without a plateau finish and a running in process would be needed to remove the peaks so as to give you the surface finish you want -and leave loads of tiny metallic particles floating around the engine which is why you needed an oil change after 1000 miles or so.
Now the bores are rough honed to create the valleys and then plateaued using a fine abrasive to remove the peaks, creating the ideal surface finish, and eliminating the need to run in the bores. It is however good practise not to thrash the car from day one as the rest of the mechanical parts do like a few hours running to bed themselves in -use it too hard from the start and you'll run the risk of tearing any metal to metal surfaces that are a bit tight leading to excessive wear.
Hope this helps
Always good to hear an experts views, thanks for taking the time to reply.
 

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Dec_mcginn said:
Looking forward to delivery of my new F-Pace in about 6 weeks.
I have a question - how long does it take for the engine to "break in" and do I need to do anything differently? I was going to try to keep the revs below 3000 for the first 1000 miles but don't know if I'll be able to resist the temptation...
Any thoughts?
One of the first, if not the first members on here to take delivery of an SC was a member called DAL. I am sure he said that the running in period (according to the manual) was 2000 miles. Can't remember what the max revs were but if you search his posts you will find it.....too late for me to look.....need to sleep....new car in about 8 hours :D
 

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Jagfpacejk said:
corriescar66 said:
Despite most modern engines being run in on the bench, I was told 300 rpm for first 500 miles & 4500rpm max until 1500 miles

....
Who told you this?
Service manager of well known JLR franchise... ( note 3000rpm for first 500 miles not 300)

This was after I asked if 15000 mile service intervals were really a good idea & what was the real lifespan of modern oils...

He told me that there intervals were fleet car driven and that if I was looking to keep the car for very long time that I should change oil more frequently and be careful how it is driven for first 1500 miles

This was 2012....
 

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Good morning all,

Thank you for your posts.

I can confirm that as per the handbook, the vehicle is built using high-precision manufacturing methods, but the moving parts of the engine must still bed-in, relative to each other. The process occurs mainly in the first 3000 km which is equivalent to 1864 miles of operation.

During this running-in period of 3000 km or 1864 miles, observe and follow the instructions below:

1. Do not fully press the accelerator pedal during starts and normal driving.

2. Avoid high engine speeds (rpm) until the engine has reached its full operating temperature.

3. Avoid labouring the engine by operating the engine in too high a gear at low speeds.

4. Gradually increase engine and road speeds.

5. Avoid continuous operation at high engine speed and abrupt stops.

6. Avoid frequent cold starts followed by short-distance driving.

7. Preferably take longer journeys.

8. Do not participate in track days, sports driving schools, or any similar events.

Many thanks,
Amellia
 
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